International Tiger Day

International Tiger Day is held annually on the 29th July. With factors including climate change, loss of habitat and hunting affecting the growing decline in numbers of tigers, this day aims to raise awareness and support tiger conservation worldwide.

Celebrate International Tiger Day in your own young learner classrooms and help teach about the importance of tigers with a collection of resources from our own big cat-inspired primary course Tiger Time below.

Tiger Time Mask

Get your students to make their own tiger masks in class with this printable template from Tiger Time. Follow the highlighted instructions from the sample Teacher's Book and help your students earn their stripes by decorating their very own Tiger mask!

Tiger Time mask and instructions

Class Activities

Quick ideas and discussion prompts for the classroom to get your students talking:

  1. Write some true or false statements on the board. In teams or as a class, discuss which statements are true and which ones are false. Try some of these statements from OneKind. Then ask your students to do something similar for another animal.
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  3. Prepare some class discussion questions, such as: ‘Would you keep a tiger is a pet? Why/Why not?’, ‘Do tigers live in Europe? Why/Why not?’
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  5. 'What can we do to protect tigers?' Get your class to design a poster based on their ideas.

Get your class researching on the internet to find the answers to the following questions:

  1. Which countries have a tiger on their flag?
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  3. What sports teams have a tiger for a mascot?
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  5. What countries have a tiger as their national animal?
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  7. How many stories or films can you name with a tiger?
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Key tiger facts

Did you know?

  • Tiger is the largest cat species
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  • Tigers can swim
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  • A baby tiger is called a cub
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  • Tigers can purr    
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  • Tigers live for 10-15 years    
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  • Tigers are orange and black (but can also be white and black)    
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  • Tigers eat only meat, such as moose, deer, pigs, cows, buffalos, goats and antelope    
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  • Every tiger is unique – no two tigers have the same patterns or stripes

Numbers of tigers:

  •  Bengal tiger: Less than 2,000 
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  • Indochinese tiger: 750-1,300    
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  • Siberian tiger: Around 450    
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  • Sumatran tiger: 400-500    
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  • Malayan tiger: 600-800    
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  • South Chinese tiger: Extinct in the wild    
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  • Caspian tiger: Extinct    
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  • Javan tiger: Extinct    
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  • Bali tiger: Extinct

*source: Defenders of Wildlife: Basic facts about tigers

Useful links:

National Geographic for kids
International Tiger Day
World Wildlife Fund: Tigers